Smoking Cessation

Your Corporate Smoking Cessation Program

  • Smokers took an average of  7.67 more days of sick leave 5
  • Medical expenditures for smokers are approximately one-third higher 6
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) puts a $3,391 price tag on each employee who smokes: $1,760 in lost productivity and $1,623 in excess medical expenditures.7 In addition, estimated costs associated with secondhand smoke’s effects on nonsmokers can add up to $490 per smoker per year.8,9
Your stop smoking program can offer $3,400 per smoker savings along with healthier employees who take fewer sick days and reduce health care cost.

We offer both on site and in office stop smoking solutions for your employees.

Our program for quitting smoking minimizes or eliminates the common fears that smokers have when they want to stop smoking. The fears that have stopped them in the past from being free of this deadly smelly habit:
  • Fear that you will have to give up your crutch or pleasure to stop smoking
  • Fear that you will not be able to enjoy life or handle stress when you stop smoking
  • Fear that you will put on weight after you stop smoking
  • Fear that you will have to go through an awful trauma and withdrawal to get free of cigarettes
  • Fear that you will never get completely free of the craving
All of these fears are just examples of one overriding fear. The one simple reason that they have not stopped smoking is that they:

Fear that it is going to be too painful and too difficult!

But guess what… by applying The Stofka Method of Behavioral Engineering
Quitting is as Simple as 123…
  • 1 – Kick the habit after just the first hour
  • 2 – Reinforce your subconscious that you are a non smoker
  • 3 – Assurance that a healthy lifestyle is all you want

Stop Smoking Programs

Group Stop Smoking Individual Stop Smoking
Take home audio Support sessions
Call for your consultation at 1-877-557-7409

Imagine the smiles of satisfied employees along with additional profits when you are part of their solution to stop smoking.

5 http://www.law.capital.edu/Tobacco/workplace/costs_smoking.html#1

6 Medical expenditures for smokers are approximately one-third higher
http://www.law.capital.edu/Tobacco/workplace/costs_smoking.html#1

7 Fellows, J.L.; Trosclair, A.; Rivera C.C.; National Center for Chronic Disease and Prevention and Health Promotion, “Annual Smoking Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Economic Costs-United States, 1995-1999.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. JAMA, (287)18:2335-2356, 8 May 2002.

8 Kristein, “How Much Can Business Expect to Profit From Smoking Cessation?” Preventive Medicine, 1983; 12:358-381.

9 Jackson & Holle, “Smoking: Perspectives 1985,” Primary Care, 1985; 12:197-21